The Times Are A-Changin...

"If your time to you
Is worth savin'
Then you better start swimmin'
Or you'll sink like a stone
For the times they are a-changin'." - Bob Dylan

Climate Haters

Saw this tweet on my timeline over the weekend, from a local newspaper guy...

"Is @spann still in denial of climate change? How can he be with what he sees?"

Needless to say, the guy is baiting me for a fight. But, I won't even respond to this because...

*I have never been in "denial" of climate change. The climate is changing. Always has, always will. He made that up.

The Warning Process Must Be Fixed

Now that I have had a chance to catch by breath after the historic April 27 tornado outbreak across Alabama, time to jot down a few important thoughts...

*I firmly believe apathy and complacency due to a high false alarm ratio over the years led to inaction in many cases that could have cost lives.

The FAR (false alarm ratio) for many NWS offices when it comes to tornado warnings is in the 80-90 percent category. I say this is simply not acceptable. Sure, the POD is excellent (probability of detection), but if most of the warnings are bad, then what good is a high POD?

A Day In The Life

I still believe some people honestly think I work six minutes a day. After all, the average length of my TV weather segments is two minutes, and I am on ABC 33/40 News three times a day, at 5, 6, and 10:00. Kind of like your pastor working one hour a week. It doesn't exactly work that way.

Here is a normal weekday schedule for me...

4:52 a.m. The alarm sounds. A little early for me, considering the fact I work the TV night shift. And, now that Daylight Saving Time is here, my body knows it is really 3:52 a.m. No human should be awake at this hour of the day.

Five Years Of WeatherBrains

Are you kidding me? The little show we started in January 2006 is now five years old.

Most of you know I work a pretty rigorous TV/Radio/Internet schedule during the week; I am up at 4:52 a.m. weekdays, and don't get home until around midnight. The radio and TV work is very structured, and doesn't leave much room to be creative.

After seeing Leo Laporte's success with podcasting, I figured it was time to crank up an Internet show about weather. I would gather some friends and just have a little fun for an hour every week. I honestly didn't care if anybody listened.

The Siren Mentality

This is what is going to kill more Alabamians than anything else in future tornado outbreaks.