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Central Alabama 7 Day Forecast

100+ Ten Days in a Row

| 10:44 am August 7, 2007 | Comments (3)

This is a story of a text-book example of an Alabama heat wave and drought.

We all know that a heat wave and drought often travel together. Look at these official daily temperatures for Cullman in July, 1952:

99 on July 20
100 July 21
101 July 22
103 July 23
105 July 24
103 July 26
103 July 27
105 July 28
108 July 29
110 July 30
100 July 31

At Muscle Shoals, in NW Alabama, only 3.83 inches of rain was recorded from June through August. That is an average of only 1.28 per month during our three prime thunderstorm months.

The 110 at Cullman on that July 30 is three degrees hotter than Birmingham’s all-time high of 107 on July 29, 1930. Birmingham had 106 in the July, 1952 heat.

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Category: Pre-November 2010 Posts

Comments (3)

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  1. Mike Wilhelm says:

    I have been thinking all summer that the drought we had the first half of the year might enhance our chance for a dangerous heat wave. Looks like it’s on us now…

  2. Dustin says:

    Interesting that this pattern is related and draws comparisons to the 20’s, 30’s, late 40’s and early 50’s. I just hear those decades brought up a lot lately when discussing our situation. How did global records of those periods compare with the current overall global pattern? Global records might be hard to find for way back then to formulate accuracy for debate. I wonder how many interesting stats and similarities we could blog? I bet I know who can feed our minds… JAY BEE !!!

  3. Bruce Gilliland says:

    I recall a heat wave of 5 or more days above 100 degrees in the late 1980s or early 1990s. When was the last time we had a heat wave like this – at or above 100 degrees for several days? Also, when have we had a drought and a heat wave at the same time? I don’t recall the 2000 drought being this hot — just no rain. We seem to be taking a double hit this year.

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